How to Protect your Windows this Hurricane Season? With Plastic?

With the first “C” storm of the season approaching land, we figured it was a good time to focus on hurricane safety, especially when it comes to protecting your windows from the high speed winds and debris that is always so dangerous. Hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season mid-August to late October.

For most people, wood is usually the first thing that comes to mind when you need to cover your windows, but is that the safest option? Here at Regal, we encourage everyone to cover all of their exterior windows with 16 mm Polygal. There are several reasons why you should choose Polygal over plywood.

1. Weight to strength ratio

2. Transparency in case of a blackout

3. Durability

4. They are REUSABLE for years!

Polygal and plywood will both protect your windows and doors from wind and flying debris. Polygal however weighs only a fraction of what plywood does, which is especially helpful if you have to protect second story windows and carry the material up a ladder.

If you have ever had to board up a house with plywood, then you know that the house has basically been turned into a cave. There is no way for natural light to enter the home, which can be a problem since blackouts are very common with hurricane weather. Most Polygal sheets, like the one below, are transparent, and if they are not transparent, they still let natural light through.

16mm Polygal

16mm Polygal

Another great advantage that Plastic panels have over plywood is that plastic does not swell or rot when exposed to water. The corrugated Polygal sheets also do not mold and do not turn green over time. So buying the material once can protect your home for years to come!

Contact Regal’s Professional Staff if you have any questions about the installation of Plastic panels for your home.

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Amy Gono Collins

About Amy Gono Collins

Amy is the marketing manager for Regal Plastics. She loves to make plastic interesting. After all, its just plastic, not rocket science! Circle me on Google+.